5 things you need to know about Video and Twitter for 2015

As we already noted in our piece about native video uploads outperforming Youtube uploads on Facebook, it’s clear that the battle for video is one of the key frontiers for the top Social Media platforms. For a while now, it’s been rumored that Twitter will soon roll out the option to upload video natively to encourage users to share videos directly on their platform versus the current option: a Youtube upload. Here is what you need to know about Twitter and video looking forward to 2015:

Everybody else is doing it, and it’s working

In mid-2013, Instagram announced it would host videos in what seemed like an answer to the Twitter-owned service Vine.  As a place often used to follow and discuss current events and breaking news, Twitter would be more closely compared to Facebook given the latter’s recent changes and emphasis on trending topics and news sources. Even Snapchat event-centric “stories” could be considered competition, and they are all seeing great success with these features, so Twitter is already late to the game. While Vine was a success of it’s own, its not the definitive answer to how video should become an integral part of the Twitter platform and they know it.

It’s already available, but only for advertisers and verified users

Promoted video ads have been available since this past August, while verified users have recently been given access to native video uploading under the condition that you don’t use the Twitter Video Player to sell “advertisements, sponsorships, or promotions including, but not limited to pre-roll, post-roll, bottom third, banners, or product placements”. If you or your brand qualify, and you interested in trying it out you can do so by visiting: https://video.twitter.com/access

Twitter has confirmed it as a priority for 2015

Introducing this option to all users has the potential to change the nature of the platform, similar to when they incorporated native image uploading, threaded conversations, and countless other little details that have made Twitter so much better and more user friendly. Back in November of 2014, VP of Product at Twitter confirmed video uploads are a priority on the company’s blog: “But aside from just watching video more easily on Twitter, you should be able to record, edit, and share your own videos natively on Twitter too. Alongside short looping Vine videos, we think you’ll have fun sharing what’s happening in your world through native video. You can expect to see this in the first half of next year.”

A move towards a non-chronological timeline might give advantage to video content

If Twitter’s new ‘While You Were Away’ feature is a sign of things to come, the micro-blogging platform might be following the Facebook model of curating the content for it’s users. Some small tests have already been seen during the 2014 World Cup and now the NFL Playoffs. If this is to become a focus for Twitter, don’t be surprised to see videos and photos to become “premium” content that floats to the top of your streams – they are more engaging, particularly for new or casual user who have proven to be a challenge for Twitter to retain.

Video ads could become a big money maker for Twitter

The current use of the Video Player and other video products such as Snappy TV -a way to cut and distribute key highlights offered only to selected media partners carrying key properties such as top Sports Leagues- carry the condition of a revenue share with Twitter. However, there is also great potential for advertisers to be able to buy pre-rolls on demand such as with Youtube. If done right, this would allow Twitter power-users and other online influencers a way to monetize video uploads and could be a great option for brands, who are often not savvy at creating online video content that is relevant for the younger crowd.

 

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Ignacio Cassinelli
nacho.cassinelli@acmconnect.com